Categories ArchivesWaste Minimisation Act

New recycling stations look out for health of the Bay standard

Arohatia Te Mātau ā Māui, do you “Love your bay”? When you are at the Hawke’s Bay Hospital or the Napier Health Centre you will have a chance to show it, with new recycling stations and food scrap bins giving staff and visitors the chance to look out for the health of the patients and the environment too. The waste diversion options were created after the Hawke’s Bay District Health Board (HBDHB) partnered with Hastings-based resource recovery experts 3R Group to assess and better manage its waste. The stations incorporate the iconic view of Cape Kidnappers, with some stations including an interactive floor decal to encourage foot traffic to them. The two recently installed stations in Napier follow the installation ...

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Packaging Forum welcomes proposed ban on single use plastic bags standard

MEDIA RELEASE: The Packaging Forum welcomes the Government’s proposal to ban all single use plastic, biodegradable and compostable bags to set a level playing field for the retail industry and to take an estimated 800 million bags out of circulation. Lyn Mayes, Manager Soft Plastics Recycling Scheme said: “Based on a recent audit around 10% of the number of bags which we collect are single use shopping carrier bags. These bags are not just from supermarkets but a wide range of retail chains as well as dairies. We have also noticed an increase in degradable and compostable bags which are a contaminant in our recycling stream. “The soft plastic recycling scheme has a target of a 35% recovery rate by ...

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A circular future with stewardship at the centre standard

by Adele Rose, 3R Chief Executive Mention the term ‘product stewardship’ to the first person you bump into on the street and chances are you will be met with a blank look. The truth is, it’s not a widely known concept in New Zealand. It also is and isn’t a simple one either. Suggest that manufacturers and retailers should take responsibility for the products they make and sell throughout the lifetime of those products (the definition of product stewardship), and the blank look will probably turn into a puzzled one. MORE MEDIA: Read this story and more in the August edition of Revolve magazine Fast-forward to the year 2050 and this will be a different story. The terms ‘sustainably produced’, ...

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Great DDT Muster off to a weighty start standard

The collection of 2.3 tonnes of banned and highly toxic pesticides from a single farm continues to surprise, 3R Group ChemCollect manager says. The Muster, which is managed by 3R, started in 2015 with the aim of ridding New Zealand of DDT and other obsolete pesticides containing persistent organic pollutants (POPs). When the programme began it was estimated seven tonnes of chemicals likely to be persistent organic pollutants remained on properties around New Zealand. However, this quota was reached in just one year and funding was extended. The total collected volume to date now sits at 12.5 tonnes, and a substantial number of bookings are scheduled for collection over the summer. 3R Group’s ChemCollect manager Jason Richards says the latest ...

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Increasing the waste levy – cut waste and create jobs standard

Increasing the waste levy will significantly reduce the high volume of waste being sent to landfill and help create jobs. The report “A Wasted Opportunity” released today by the New Zealand Waste Levy Action Group recommends broadening and raising the levy charged on all waste sent to landfill. Currently $10 per tonne, the levy is well below that of other countries charging a similar levy. Adele Rose, 3R Group Chief Executive, believes New Zealand’s low rates of resource recovery and product stewardship have a direct correlation to the levy. “The low value placed on our waste provides little or no incentive for businesses or consumers to change their behaviour and seek out more positive outcomes for their ‘rubbish’. Mrs Rose ...

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Kick starting the Circular Economy standard

This is the third article in a series about councils and the circular economy. In the previous two, I challenged cites (and districts) as to who would be the first to embrace the circular economy and where they could find the funds to do this. Typically, councils in New Zealand only manage around 30% of the waste stream and that tends to be waste produced by householders. The vast majority of waste is produced and managed by the private sector, so it’s tricky for councils to directly influence these waste producers. However, there are still plenty of ways that councils can help to reduce waste within their district and encourage a shift towards a circular economy. This article highlights a ...

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