Categories ArchivesProduct Stewardship

Building a circular economy standard

In order to move forward we need to start going around in circles. Such is the thinking behind a circular economy; one that doesn’t follow the linear process of taking resources, making products and then throwing them away, but rather creating a circular process where products are created and then stay in the system to be reused, recycled or repurposed. Nothing is wasted. The venue of our third Sustainable Business Network (SBN) Regional Business Connector event, FG Smiths, is the perfect example of this theory in practice. The building in which the popular eatery is housed was remodelled with circular economy building practices firmly at the forefront of the design. PMA Architects showcased ‘adaptive reuse’ through their work on the ...

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Mattresses ready to Rebound standard

The Rebound mattress recycling scheme was featured in Revolve magazine recently. Mattresses account for around 8,100 tonnes of landfill waste, even though up to 90 per cent of mattress materials can be recycled. However, there is a growing will to do something about the problem. “With everyone being more and more conscious of our environment, we think our customers will embrace this programme.” – Big Save Furniture director Lily Salter Read the full article

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Increasing the waste levy – cut waste and create jobs standard

Increasing the waste levy will significantly reduce the high volume of waste being sent to landfill and help create jobs. The report “A Wasted Opportunity” released today by the New Zealand Waste Levy Action Group recommends broadening and raising the levy charged on all waste sent to landfill. Currently $10 per tonne, the levy is well below that of other countries charging a similar levy. Adele Rose, 3R Group Chief Executive, believes New Zealand’s low rates of resource recovery and product stewardship have a direct correlation to the levy. “The low value placed on our waste provides little or no incentive for businesses or consumers to change their behaviour and seek out more positive outcomes for their ‘rubbish’. Mrs Rose ...

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Tyre recycling initiatives welcomed standard

Recycling specialists 3R Group are welcoming today’s announcement from the Minister for the Environment of $18.6 million in funding for used tyre recycling initiatives. “There is no doubt that this is a positive step forward in dealing with the more than five million tyres that reach their end of life each year in New Zealand,” said 3R Chief Executive Adele Rose, “however we are disappointed that these initiatives are not part of a wider product stewardship approach for tyres.” 3R Group led the industry-supported Tyrewise project which proposed compulsory product stewardship for used tyres in New Zealand. Tyrewise would have seen the current $3-$5 per tyre disposal fee charged by the vast majority of tyre retailers scraped in favour of ...

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12 years partnering Resene standard

3R Group have been partnering with Resene for 12 years, operationally managing Resene PaintWise and finding innovative uses for paint. Yesterday, new Associate Environment Minister, Scott Simpson, visited Resene’s factory in Lower Hutt and released this to celebrate the programme’s success to date. Source: Beehive NZ Three million paint containers recycled Resene has recycled over three million paint containers and found innovative uses for leftover paint, with its PaintWise scheme, Associate Environment Minister Scott Simpson announced today at Resene’s factory in Lower Hutt. “Often consumers buy more paint than they need for a project and the leftover paint is stored in sheds and cupboards, or is taken to the local landfill for disposal. Resene PaintWise provides New Zealanders with an ...

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Kick starting the Circular Economy standard

This is the third article in a series about councils and the circular economy. In the previous two, I challenged cites (and districts) as to who would be the first to embrace the circular economy and where they could find the funds to do this. Typically, councils in New Zealand only manage around 30% of the waste stream and that tends to be waste produced by householders. The vast majority of waste is produced and managed by the private sector, so it’s tricky for councils to directly influence these waste producers. However, there are still plenty of ways that councils can help to reduce waste within their district and encourage a shift towards a circular economy. This article highlights a ...

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